whiterosemoxie Won’t Stay Low-Key for Long

“Hell yeah, I dropped that bitch and everybody was like, ‘oh shit!’ Bro, and then we—phew. Bro the whole thing was videotaped by like four different people bruh. Shit was crazy.”

This is what eighteen year old Whiterosemoxie—fresh off the stage for the first time ever—said after opening for Lil Tjay in Detroit just last February. As he and his friends pile into their car after the show, the energy between them is palpable. “Bro,” says the friend Moxie is talking to, “you ate that!” 

Moxie’s post-show exhilaration, captured on episode two of his vlog series Serragoda Life, is an insightful peek into Moxie’s attitude towards his burgeoning rap career. Having performed his first show, dropped his first album, and earned his first million plays all within the space of the last five months, everything about being an underground star is new to Moxie—but the young artist knows his future is bright, and he’s hungry for it. 

Having performed his first show, dropped his first album, and earned his first million plays all within the space of the last five months, everything about being an underground star is new to Moxie.

Born and raised in Detroit, Moxie spent his early high school years in the Detroit Public School system before he was accepted into a private high school. Moxie cites the change as a point of growth: “with the transition between crowds and places in my life, I feel like it expanded my music taste” he told Pigeons & Planes. As a result of the move, Moxie’s influences range from acts like Travis Scott and Juice WRLD to bands like Paramore and Panic! At the Disco. These varied influences grant Moxie a great deal of stylistic freedom when he creates. “It really just comes down to raw emotion,” says Moxie of his recording process. “The energy of the day plays a huge role in the final product.”

The stylistic range granted by these influences is reflected in Moxie’s debut album White Ceilings, a surprisingly mature body of work for such a young artist. On the album, Moxie displays a precocious talent for crafting electrifying rap cuts and sweet, soft-sided pop or R&B jams alike. The standout song from the album is the opening track “trix,” a hungry, freewheeling South Florida and West Coast-touched banger that picks up an absurd amount of momentum in its short two-minute runtime. It’s unique and one of the hardest songs of the year—honestly it merits its own review—and I wouldn’t be surprised if it became Moxie’s breakout song. 

On the other end of the spectrum (but just as stylistically adept) are R&B leaning standouts “West Side Boys” and “Go.” On these songs, which showcase Moxie’s talent as a songwriter, Moxie reveals a vulnerable side of himself that reflects on his upbringing and future. On “Go,” Moxie sings:

“God damn grandma, why you have to leave right now
Wish that you could see right now
What I’m bout to be right now.”

Besides proving his genre-bending ability, introspective moments like this are rewarding because they show Moxie’s honesty as an artist: he isn’t afraid to put his emotions into his music. As he told Pigeons & Planes: “Some days I just needed to get shit off my chest.” Moxie’s bouncy moments and downtempo moods mix well on White Ceilings, which itself features a gradual sonic shift from sharp-edged rap tracks to more affected, melodic cuts over the course of its runtime. 

Despite the precocious maturity and polish of his music, there is a hunger about the eighteen year old Whiterosemoxie that makes his well-crafted music feel sincere and raw. With a natural talent for marrying moshpit-inducing rap with the thoughtful sounds of R&B and pop on his projects, Moxie’s tremendous momentum is only an indication of the promising career he has ahead of him. 

Previous

The Quiet Optimism of Kota The Friend

[sLUms] Displays That Originality is Still Appreciated

Next

Leave a Comment